07776 202708 Mon-Sat: 08:00 AM - 17:00 PM

Kent Urban Kitchen Microgreens supplies many varieties of microgreens directly in Leigh.

We are a Kent born and raised family business, operating our growing room just a stone's throw from Ramsgate seafront. We are delighted to supply Microgreens across the whole of Leigh and the South East. As well as supplying to private Leigh clients, we have a developing network of Leigh restaurants and Leigh caterers to whom we deliver door-to-door, and are continuously adding new and experimental product varieties to meet the preference and taste of our customers. We feel it is really important, more than ever before, to reduce food miles and consume food consciously from local, traceable sources. Plus, it tastes so much better when you know where it's come from!

Some Leigh restaurants


Eat
327 2nd St

Burrito King
212 S Main St

Klub 81
Hwy 81/91 Jct



Types of Leigh Microgreens

Cabbage, comprising several cultivars of Brassica oleracea, is a leafy green, red (purple), or white (pale green) biennial plant grown as an annual vegetable crop for its dense-leaved heads. It is descended from the wild cabbage (B. oleracea var. oleracea), and belongs to the "cole crops" or brassicas, meaning it is closely related to broccoli and cauliflower (var. botrytis); Brussels sprouts (var. gemmifera); and Savoy cabbage (var. sabauda). A cabbage generally weighs between 500 to 1,000 grams (1 to 2 lb). Smooth-leafed, firm-headed green cabbages are the most common, with smooth-leafed purple cabbages and crinkle-leafed savoy cabbages of both colours being rarer. Under conditions of long sunny days, such as those found at high northern latitudes in summer, cabbages can grow quite large. As of 2012, the heaviest cabbage was 62.71 kilograms (138 lb 4 oz). Cabbage heads are generally picked during the first year of the plant's life cycle, but plants intended for seed are allowed to grow a second year and must be kept separate from other cole crops to prevent cross-pollination. Cabbage is prone to several nutrient deficiencies, as well as to multiple pests, and bacterial and fungal diseases. Cabbage was most likely domesticated somewhere in Europe in Ancient history before 1000 BC. Cabbage in the cuisine has been documented since Antiquity. It was described as a table luxury in the Roman Empire. By the Middle Ages, cabbage had become a prominent part of European cuisine, as indicated by manuscript illuminations. New variates were introduced from the Renaissance on, mostly by Germanic-speaking peoples. Savoy cabbage was developed in the 16th century. By the 17th and 18th centuries, cabbage was popularised as staple food in central, northern, and eastern Europe. It was also employed by European sailors to prevent scurvy during long ship voyages at sea. Starting in the Early Modern Era, cabbage was exported to the Americas, Asia, and around the world.They can be prepared many different ways for eating; they can be pickled, fermented (for dishes such as sauerkraut), steamed, stewed, roasted, sautéed, braised, or eaten raw. Raw cabbage is a rich source of vitamin K, vitamin C, and dietary fiber. World production of cabbage and other brassicas in 2020 was 71 million tonnes, led by China with 48% of the total.

Why choose Kent Urban Kitchen?

Choosing us will mean you are buying a local, quality product with a personal service that you can be proud to serve to your customers. We are flexible to suit your schedule, and no order is too small. If there is a variety or product you would like, send as an enquiry and we will get back to you as soon as we can.

Trade Offers for Leigh Restaurants, Leigh Caterers and Retail

Our Growers

See the people behind the plants.

Daniel Morris

Master Grower

Contact Us

To chat to us about anything related to our business, orders and questions, please drop us a line.

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